Twenty-eight-year-old Muhibullah is a tuberculosis (TB) survivor who has become a health worker after being cured of the illness. He has made it his mission to help other patients, and raise awareness among his community about the disease.
Mohammad Rafi Sediqi, a reporter with Ariana News, remembers how difficult it used to be to file a news report about the work of the Meshrano Jirga.
Parwana is a young woman living in Mazar-e Sharif of Balkh province. Unfortunately, she became one of millions of women around the world who experience domestic violence.
Two years ago, Usman Noorzai was standing in his village of Shade Bara when he heard a rumbling sound. “We looked up, and saw tremendous flood waters coming down from the mountains. We were fixated with fear.”
Despite its natural beauty, until recently, Sang-e-Nawishta had its share of problems. Villagers did not have access to clean water, and had to drink from a polluted canal. This led to high levels of disease.
For Atifa Faizi, graduating from Afghanistan's first Master’s programme in Gender Equality and Women's Rights has opened up a world of possibilities.
For Majid, the problems were just beginning. “Not long after mom died, I started to have difficulties in breathing, coughing, as well as back and chest pain,” he remembers.

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When we began our work five decades ago, one in three people worldwide lived in poverty. Now? Just one in eight. Let’s finish the job.

About Afghanistan

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31.7%

of Afghans are literate

35.8%

of population living below the national poverty line

17.5

is the median age in Afghanistan

8.3%

of people uses internet

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