Our Stories

  • Afghan Police Recruit Women to Fight Crime and Stigma
    Jun 18, 2013

    It was four years ago that Captain Zohra Daulatzia joined the Afghan National Police. But the mother of two girls still gets excited about that momentous day in her life when she achieved one of her life’s greatest ambitions.

  • Peace: the Distant, Hopeful Dream of Every Afghan
    Sep 20, 2017

    One Autumn day in 1998, seven-year old Zarghona Darya was doing her homework on the floor of the family house in Bamyan province, when her father rushed in, shouting “Taliban! Taliban!”

  • Rule of Law

    Security continues to be the major barrier to development in Afghanistan. Parts of the country remain occupied by anti-government forces and the UN recorded more civilian casualties in 2015 than in any other year on record. Peace negotiations restarted in January 2015, with preliminary talks involving Afghanistan, Pakistan, the US and China.

  • Ministry of Interior and UNDP to Make Police Facilities More Women-Friendly

    It takes a great deal of courage for a woman to be a police officer in Afghanistan. There are only 3,000 women serving in a force of more than 150,000 across the country. These women had to fight the cultural restrictions to join the ranks of police.

  • Rule of Law

    Security continues to be the major barrier to development in Afghanistan. Parts of the country remain occupied by anti-government forces and the UN recorded more civilian casualties in 2015 than in any other year on record. Peace negotiations restarted in January 2015, with preliminary talks involving Afghanistan, Pakistan, the US and China.

  • Making Afghanistan a Safer Place: 250 Women Police Return From Training in Turkey

    12 February 2017, Kabul, Afghanistan – For 24-year-old Nabila, becoming a police officer was not only a childhood dream but a sacred duty. This was something she felt she had to do after witnessing the suffering of women in her community. But it was not an easy decision for the mother of a 6-year-old in a town where only two women had ever been brave enough to join the police force. She had to go up against neighbors who said women police were “despicable” and “corrupting the minds of other girls”.

  • Even nurses need lawyers: UNDP funds legal aid for women

    Nangarhar, 03 March 2016 – At 19 years of age, Gul Bashra had completed school, finished two years of midwifery training, and was all set to realize her lifelong dream of bringing better healthcare to her fellow Afghans in Nangarhar.

  • Taxi Driver Beats Unfair Murder Rap - in Just One Month

    Mazar-e-Sharif, 3 February 2016 – Sayed Hakim, a 27-year old taxi driver and father of four, worked hard every day, but he was happy with his life. Little did he know that everything he enjoyed could disappear in a flash.

  • Stitched up in Herat: UNDP helps free taxi driver from false accusation

    Herat, 15 February 2016 — Twenty-three-year-old Noor Ahmad drives a motorbike in Heart to support his family. His father has two wives and two sets of children, which is common in parts of Afghanistan. One day, rivalries between these two sides of the one family boiled over. It nearly pulled his life apart.

  • Former Fighter Opts for Peace: How UNDP Helps Start New Lives in Safer Communities

    “I loved my gun; it gave me dignity. But it was used for the wrong purpose, so I handed it over to be used for good,” says former Taliban fighter, 43-year-old Dawood Jan Nangyaly. Mulah Dawood, as he is also known, was a deputy commander leading some 60 insurgents against national and international forces in Zabul Province’s Nawbahar District.

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