Afghan Policewomen Get Skills to Lead Change and Restore Trust

POLICEWOMEN ATTENDING TRAINING IN COMPUTER SKILLS
UNDP Afghanistan / Titus Moetsabi: POLICEWOMEN ATTENDING TRAINING IN COMPUTER SKILLS

One of the top ten priorities of the Ministry of Interior (MoI) is to promote gender equity and women as role models of change in the Afghan National Police (ANP). UNDP’s Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOFTA) is supporting the MoI in training policewomen in leadership and management skills at the Kabul Police Academy.

The three-month long training aims to raise the skills and competencies of 17 women police officers to enhance their growth opportunities and effectiveness. The programme covers areas such as computer skills, time management, communication, performance management, accounting, media relations, community policing, laws and procedures.

Key Results

  • The three-month long training aims to raise the skills and competencies of 17 women police officers to enhance their growth opportunities and effectiveness.
  • Policewomen assigned to FRUs have been trained in crime-scene investigation, handling evidence, taking statements and interviewing witnesses and victims.
  • The Policewomen are trained on computer skills, time management, communication, performance management, accounting, media relations, community policing, laws and procedures.

“As a police officer, this course has opened my eyes”, says Major Nasrin Raofi. “I feel I am now better equipped to perform my duties.”

The Government of Afghanistan through its skills development programmes for the Afghan National Police (ANP) intends to develop a police force that is visible, widely trusted by the public and capable of protecting human rights, while simultaneously capable of dealing with crimes, investigations and security.

“I have learned that I should have confidence, integrity and observe mutual respect. I joined the ANP because I want to serve my people since I know there is a need for women to join the police force,” says Major Zulhaja Atayee from General Command of Border Police.

Women presently constitute 1% of the entire ANP. They face many challenges. They have been the target of insurgent attacks in the same way as their male colleagues. Some male colleagues expect policewomen to do chores rather than their policing duties. Colonel Zarghona observed that notwithstanding the many constraints they face, Afghan policewomen should lead by example and become role models for avoiding corruption.

The women police officers and staff also work in ‘Family-Response Units (FRUs)’ that have been set up to deal exclusively with crimes against women and to extend counseling and legal aid to women victims of violence. Policewomen assigned to FRUs have been trained in crime-scene investigation, handling evidence, taking statements and interviewing witnesses and victims.

Major Gul Makay emphasized that when women have access to information they can execute their duties and tasks efficiently. “This in turn will encourage and help our sisters to serve our nation by joining the ANP.’ While the policewomen accept that it is a long walk to gender equity in the ANP, their passion for the police force is fearless.
“I want to serve my country and work with my brothers in the ANP because this country needs both male and female police,” says Second Lieutenant Nasima from Training and Education Command, MoI.

Results in Focus
UNDP Afghanistan 2013 Annual Report

During 2013, UNDP Afghanistan remained committed to maintaining a close working relationship with Afghanistan’s government and people. It reorganised its work around the areas of inclusive and legitimate politics; sub-national governance and development; rule of law; and the cross-cutting areas of gender, capacity development, and poverty and the environment. In this context, projects were implemented and results achieved in the areas of peacebuilding, rule of law, democratic governance, poverty reduction and livelihoods, and managing resources for sustainability and resilience. For more information, please download the full report. English PDF 

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