Our Stories

  • A Seller’s Market - UNDP Helps Street Vendors in Kabul
    May 26, 2016

    Every day in Kabul, around 700,000 street vendors rise with the sun and rush into the city to earn a living. Managing this huge influx of people is a major challenge for Kabul municipality and the police. They don’t want blocked roads and traffic chaos, but the vendors also need to earn a living.

  • Ministry of Interior Affairs and UNDP Sign New LOTFA Agreement
    May 26, 2016

    Fahima*, pregnant, was forced by her husband to crawl on all fours with the family’s dogs. It was just one of the ways she was abused during her one year marriage. He also beat her with sticks, yelled obscenities at her and poured boiling water on her hands.

  • Improving Accountability Through Access to Information
    May 26, 2016

    While doing a story on maternal health in Afghanistan, journalist Mary Nabardaeen wanted to know how many women had died in childbirth at a certain hospital. Officials refused to reveal the number, saying that doing so was prohibited by the minister of public health. It was a response that the head of the Bakhter News Agency had become familiar with in her twenty years as a journalist. It was just another example of the challenges she has faced in attempting to get information from the government.

  • Police and the People Become Closer in Herat
    May 26, 2016

    In a country like Afghanistan, emerging from decades of conflict, people deeply feel the need for a police force that is closer to the community. Traditionally, Afghan citizens have harboured suspicion and fear towards the police dating back to the years of war. But this image is now gradually changing as the Ministry of Interior Affairs (MOIA) has rolled out a model for Community Oriented Policing with technical support and funding from the Law and Order Trust Fund, which seeks to bring communities and police closer to each other.

  • Leaving a Fighting Life Behind, the Ex-Fighters Enjoying Reunion with their Families and Friends
    May 26, 2016

    Since early 2013, close to 700 combatants have surrendered their weapons and reintegrated with their families and communities in eastern provinces of Kunar, Laghman, Nangarhar and Nuristan as a result of concerted efforts of a number of state agencies, including the provincial offices of the High Peace Council and Afghanistan National Security Department, with technical support from UNDP’s Afghanistan Peace and Reintegration Programme (APRP).

  • Newly Trained Law Students to Respond to Legal Needs in Helmand Province
    May 26, 2016

    Abdullah Atal is a law student at Arakozia University in Helmand province. Though in his last year, he had yet to study key aspects of practicing law, such as how to process criminal and civil cases. That is, until he attended a training session sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme’s Justice and Human Rights in Afghanistan (JHRA) project.

  • UNDP supports Initiatives to Provide Legal Aid in Helmand
    May 26, 2016

    People accused of crimes or imprisoned in Helmand province will now have access to legal representation and legal aid following the opening of the office of the Afghanistan Independent Bar Association (AIBA) in Lashkar Gar. The initiative, supported by UNDP’s Justice and Human Rights (JHRA) project, will mobilise 10 defence lawyers who are expected to provide legal support to approximately 150 people in 2014. The project is funded by Denmark.

  • UNDP Supports Improved Workplace Safety for Afghan Policewomen
    May 26, 2016

    Until mid-2014, Sergeant Mastura and her 11 female colleagues based at a police station in Kabul had to cope with the fact that most police premises simply were not designed to cater for the needs of female employees. “We did not have a separate place for ablutions so we had to use the same toilets as the policemen,” said First Sergeant Mastura, who has served with the national police force for six years.

  • Code of Conduct underpins modern policing in Afghanistan
    May 26, 2016

    Afghanistan’s national police force virtually disappeared as a legacy of decades of conflict. Hikmatullah Stanikzai, 26, and Safiullah Stanikzai, 25, are part of a new generation at the Afghan National Police (ANP), determined to rebuild a renewed police force capable of protecting the rights of citizens and promoting national unity among Afghans.

  • Future Officers Buoyed by Post-elections Praise for Police
    May 26, 2016

    Afghanistan’s national police force virtually disappeared as a legacy of decades of conflict. Hikmatullah Stanikzai, 26, and Safiullah Stanikzai, 25, are part of a new generation at the Afghan National Police (ANP), determined to rebuild a renewed police force capable of protecting the rights of citizens and promoting national unity among Afghans.

  • Building Skills for Afghan Policewomen to Lead Change and Restore Public Trust
    May 26, 2016

    One of the top ten priorities of the Ministry of Interior (MoI) is to promote gender equity and women as role models of change in the Afghan National Police (ANP). UNDP’s Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOFTA) is supporting the MoI in training policewomen in leadership and management skills at the Kabul Police Academy.

  • Trading Guns for Tube-Wells, Sowing Seeds of Lasting Peace
    May 26, 2016

    Mohammad Akbar (name changed), 47, a former combatant from a village in one of the northern provinces of Afghanistan, turned in his weapons, along with those of his ten men to the Afghanistan Peace and Reintegration Programme (APRP).

  • Bringing the police closer to the people
    May 26, 2016

    Colonel Noor Aqa Ibrahimkhail, the district Chief of Police for Farza, located 45 kilometres north of Kabul, is a veteran officer who has experienced many brushes with violence and unrest throughout his career. But compared to his previous postings, he says, Farza is a haven of peace and tranquility.

  • Getting out of a Pickle – Business Training Helps Women Succeed in the Market
    May 26, 2016

    08 February 2016, Nangarhar - Small businesses in Afghanistan often find it difficult to find customers and lack the management and marketing skills needed to compete with foreign imports.

  • Afghanistan’s First Female District Police Chief: Colonel Jamila Bayaz
    May 26, 2016

    She was supposed to be an engineer. But Jamila Bayaz lasted a year studying engineering at Kabul University before finally convincing her family to let her join the police force.

  • Women Entrepreneurs from Herat Link with Kabul-Area Markets
    May 26, 2016

    Women from across the western province of Herat are engaged in a number of entrepreneurship activities that include making handicrafts and jewelry, growing saffron and processing dry fruit such as pistachio and almond. Women entrepreneurs from Herat City, and Gozara, Injil, Karukh, Koshan and Zindajan districts of Herat province are particularly active in running and expanding their small-scale businesses.

  • Thank, you EU! Power for Panjshir
    May 26, 2016

    Panjshir, 19 April 2016 — Before 2015, Pyawasht village in Panjshir had no electricity. Doctors stumbled over mountain roads to reach their patients, kids couldn’t study after sundown, and women gave birth in the dark.

  • A Bridge to a Better Future - One of Nearly 600 UNDP Transport Projects
    May 26, 2016

    Panjshir, 27 January 2015 — Panjshir Valley, a 2-hour drive north of Kabul, is known for its scenic mountains and crystal clear rivers. It remains one of the safest places in Afghanistan as its sky-high mountains and narrow roads are a natural barrier against terrorism. Its beauty attracts local families from nearby provinces to visit for picnics, fishing, photography and swimming.

  • Religious Inter-school Competition Inspires Young Leaders
    May 26, 2016

    Kabul, Afghanistan: “I want to be the President of Afghanistan.” This is Zhania’s response when asked about her ambitions. Zhania Zainab is the top scorer among the students of her school and for the last three years has attended a madrassa (religious school).

  • Jewelry Making Brings Hope to Impoverished Women in Herat
    May 26, 2016

    A UNDP programme trains women in jewelry making so that they can provide their families with incomes and escape abusive situations Every day Sediqa, 26, walks for two hours to get to her jewelry making class. “I save my transportation allowance to buy food for my children,” she says.

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