Our Stories

  • The women’s committee of the High Peace Council (HPC), an Afghan body involved in the country’s peace efforts, has submitted today a petition – containing the signatures of more than 250,000 Afghan women and girls calling for peace – to the Country Director of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Afghanistan for onward transmission to the UNDP Administrator Helen Clark.

  • An Afghan women’s rights activist, Masouda Karokhi, has received in Kabul the 2013 N-Peace Award, an initiative supported by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).

  • Newly-married and pregnant Amena recently took the bold step of leaving her violent husband. She is among the millions of Afghan women for whom life has improved over the past decade. Today, more women are able to access services, like legal aid, participate in decision-making, and more girls are enrolled in school than a decade ago.

  • Herat, November 2011: Fatima (name changed), resident of Injil on the outskirts of Herat city in western Afghanistan, was married to her first cousin Sultan, at age 15. Unable to cope with the daily physical violence of her husband who also forbade her from attending school, and daily arguments with her mother-in-law, she ran away to her parent’s home. It has been seven months since Fatima left her husband’s home and her condition is exacerbated by the fact she is in an advanced stage of pregnancy.

  • Azima Safi, 50, runs a small embroidery business in Jalalabad. She learned sewing handicrafts when she lived with her family as a refugee in Peshawar, Pakistan during the 90s. As the oldest kid in the family, she had to quit school at grade five and work for someone else making handicrafts at a low daily wage, which she spent on her siblings’ schooling. Upon returning to Afghanistan in 1998, she started up a home-based embroidery business of her own in Jalalabad, Nangarhar province.

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