Our Stories

  • Female Nurses in Demand: UNDP Trains 200+ Young Women to Save Lives in Rural Areas

    23 October 2016, Jalalabad City, Nangarhar – In a very ordinary hostel in Jalalabad, something extraordinary is going on. A young woman is sitting on her hostel bed, bent over a textbook. This is Abida and she is training to be a nurse in a country where most women haven’t even finished primary school. Abida has just finished a long day of classwork and on-the-job training. She’s exhausted, but determined to carry on because nurses are hard to find in her home village, more than 100 kilometres away in Nuristan. In this isolated province, woman commonly die because basic healthcare is unavailable – either because there are no doctors or because women are not allowed to be treated by a man. Thinking about this situation keeps Abida going when her eyes are heavy and her brain numb.

  • No Lingering! UNDP and Religious Leaders Promote Women in Sport and Education

    Bamyan, 9 October 2016 – Bamyan, in central Afghanistan, is a province of snow-capped mountains and difficult travel. But it’s not just the rugged terrain that keeps girls from going to school and taking part in sports. The mind also has mountains that girls need to climb if they want to get equal treatment.

  • Gender and Women's Studies at Kabul University: A Step Towards Addressing the Gender Gap

    Kabul, 10 July 2016 – Afghanistan is one of the most challenging countries in the world to be a woman – and for a woman to get a decent education. According to World Bank data, net enrollment at the end of the Taliban regime in 2001 was 43% for boys but a miserable 3% for girls. Since 2002, school enrollment has skyrocketed, boosting the number of girls in secondary education from 3% to 36%, but access to higher education remains a challenge, especially in remote areas.

  • A day in Mazar with the Korean Ambassador

    08 February 2016, Nangarhar - Small businesses in Afghanistan often find it difficult to find customers and lack the management and marketing skills needed to compete with foreign imports.

  • After half a life of working in UNDP, Farida has seen a lot, learned a lot and helped a lot of people

    24 February 2016, Kabul — Farida Alam is UNDP Afghanistan’s longest-serving member of staff. She’s been with us for 25 years – a period in which Afghanistan and UNDP have seen astonishing changes.

  • Getting out of a Pickle – Business Training Helps Women Succeed in the Market

    08 February 2016, Nangarhar - Small businesses in Afghanistan often find it difficult to find customers and lack the management and marketing skills needed to compete with foreign imports.

  • Afghanistan’s First Female District Police Chief: Colonel Jamila Bayaz

    She was supposed to be an engineer. But Jamila Bayaz lasted a year studying engineering at Kabul University before finally convincing her family to let her join the police force.

  • Women Entrepreneurs from Herat Link with Kabul-Area Markets

    Women from across the western province of Herat are engaged in a number of entrepreneurship activities that include making handicrafts and jewelry, growing saffron and processing dry fruit such as pistachio and almond. Women entrepreneurs from Herat City, and Gozara, Injil, Karukh, Koshan and Zindajan districts of Herat province are particularly active in running and expanding their small-scale businesses.

  • Religious Inter-school Competition Inspires Young Leaders

    Kabul, Afghanistan: “I want to be the President of Afghanistan.” This is Zhania’s response when asked about her ambitions. Zhania Zainab is the top scorer among the students of her school and for the last three years has attended a madrassa (religious school).

  • Jewelry Making Brings Hope to Impoverished Women in Herat

    A UNDP programme trains women in jewelry making so that they can provide their families with incomes and escape abusive situations Every day Sediqa, 26, walks for two hours to get to her jewelry making class. “I save my transportation allowance to buy food for my children,” she says.